Adults

Keep Up To Date. Vaccinate.

Shots are not just for kids. Everyone needs to be vaccinated so they can stay healthy no matter their age. It’s because your immunity from childhood vaccines can wear off, and there are many adult diseases you’ve never been vaccinated for. Getting your immunizations can help you stay healthy. And all you have to do is take a shot like a kid again. Talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated. Below is a list of diseases that you should get vaccinated for and why you should do so.

Chickenpox

You should receive two varicella vaccines. Chickenpox is very contagious and can spread easily from infected people. Its symptoms include an itchy rash, blisters, tiredness, headache, and fever.

Diphtheria

You should receive the Tdap vaccine once and a Td booster vaccine every ten years. Diphtheria is a very contagious bacterial disease that affects the respiratory system. It can be passed from person to person through a cough or sneeze. It can cause weakness, sore throats, low-grade fevers, and swollen glands in the neck. In severe cases the illness can cause coma, paralysis, and even death.

Hepatitis A

You should receive two HepA vaccines over your adult lifetime. Hepatitis A is an infection in the liver. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, and jaundice. An infected person may have no symptoms, may have mild illness for a week or two, or may have severe illness for several months that requires hospitalization. In the U.S., about 100 people a year die from hepatitis A.

Hepatitis B

You should receive three HepB vaccines over your adult lifetime. Hepatitis B is an infection in the liver. The virus spreads from the exchange of blood and other bodily fluids. It causes flu-like symptoms with loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, rashes, joint pain, and jaundice. The virus can stay in the liver of some people for the rest of their lives.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

Women should receive 3 HPV vaccines and men should receive 6 HPV vaccines in-between the ages of 19 and 26. Human Papillomavirus is very common with people in their teens and early 20s. It’s a major cause of cervical cancer in women, as well as anal cancer and genital warts in both men and women.

Influenza

You should receive the flu vaccine once a year. Influenza is a very contagious viral infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The virus can spread quickly causing mild to severe illness. Symptoms include high fever, chills, cough, headache, runny nose, sore throat, and muscle and joint pain. In severe cases, influenza can lead to hospitalization or even death.

Measles

You should get the MMR vaccine two times before your 55th birthday. Measles is one of the most contagious vaccine-preventable diseases. It is spread through the air. Symptoms include rash, fever, cough, and red watery eyes. Measles can also cause pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, or death.

Meningococcal Disease (Meningitis)

Men and women should receive a minimum of one dose of the MCV vaccine after 19 years of age. Meningococcal disease is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis. The bacteria is spread through the exchange of nose and throat droplets, such as coughing, sneezing or kissing. Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, headache and stiff neck, often with nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light and confusion. About one of every ten people who get the disease dies from it.

Mumps

You should get the MMR vaccine two times before your 55th birthday. Mumps is an infectious disease that can spread by coughing or sneezing from an infected person. A person can also become infected by coming into contact with a contaminated object, like a toy. Symptoms include fever, headaches, painful swelling of the salivary glands, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

You should receive the Tdap vaccine once and a Td booster vaccine every 10 years. Pertussis is caused by bacteria spreading through coughing or sneezing. Early symptoms are similar to the common cold. After 1-2 weeks, it can cause spells of violent coughing and choking. Pertussis is most serious for babies who can die from the disease.

Pneumonia

You should get the pneumococcal vaccine 1 to 3 times in-between the ages of 19 and 64, and you should get another shot when you’re 65+. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that is caused by bacteria. This bacteria can cause ear infections, sinus infections, meningitis, and sepsis (blood stream infection). This disease can be fatal or result in long-term problems.

Rubella

You should get the MMR vaccine two times before your 55th birthday. Rubella, or the German Measles, is a virus that is spread through coughing and sneezing. It can be very serious for babies in the womb.

Shingles

You should receive the zoster vaccine anytime after the age of 60. Shingles is the same virus that causes chickenpox. After someone has chickenpox the varicella zoster virus becomes dormant and stays in the body. For reasons that are not fully known, the virus can reactivate years later, causing shingles. Almost 1 out of 3 people in the U.S. will develop shingles.

Tetanus

You should receive the Tdap vaccine once and a Td booster vaccine every ten years. Tetanus is when bacteria enters the body through a wound, such as a cut. When people get infected the bacteria produces a toxin that causes serious, painful spasms and stiffness of all muscles in the body. Complete recovery can take months. And 10-20% of the people who get tetanus die from the disease.

Adults

Shots are not just for kids. Everyone needs to be vaccinated so they can stay healthy no matter their age. It’s because your immunity from childhood vaccines can wear off, and there are many adult diseases . . . Read More

Teens

Making sure your teen is caught-up with all of their vaccines will protect them from many infectious diseases. Talk to your doctor about what type of immunizations your teen needs. Below is a list of diseases . . . READ MORE

Kids

Kids from birth to 12 years old are particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases. That’s why it’s very important to protect them with the right immunizations. These immunizations will help prevent the spread of disease . . . READ MORE

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